Blended Learning, Corporate, Cost of Education, Domestic, Education Quality, Elementary / Primary / Junior, Flipped Classrooms, High school / Secondary 2, Public education, Required, School teachers, Students - Written by on Monday, February 13, 2012 19:25 - 0 Comments

Heard: North Carolina District Lays Off Teachers To Buy Macbooks For Students

Image by petervanallen via Flickr under CreativeCommons

The New York Times published an excellent story (Feb. 12, 2012) by Alan Schwarz, which homes in on Mooresville, N.C., as a model for technology used in East Mooresville Intermediate School. The school district has contracted a major laptop deal with Apple Inc. The report indicates that the big purchase is getting results. While it is a good anecdotal piece that must surely make Apple and other technology firms happy… of course education officials and school districts should continue tracking data on such technology purchases to see if they truly do get results. The jury is still out on best methods for digital learning.

As debate continues over whether schools invest wisely in technology — and whether it measurably improves student achievement — Mooresville, a modest community about 20 miles north of Charlotte best known as home to several Nascar teams and drivers, has quietly emerged as the de facto national model of the digital school.

Mr. Edwards spoke on a White House panel in September, and federal Department of Education officials often cite Mooresville as a symbolic success. Overwhelmed by requests to view the programs in action, the district now herds visitors into groups of 60 for monthly demonstrations; the waiting list stretches to April. What they are looking for is an explanation for the steady gains Mooresville has made since issuing laptops three years ago to the 4,400 4th through 12th graders in five schools (three K-3 schools are not part of the program).

The district’s graduation rate was 91 percent in 2011, up from 80 percent in 2008. On state tests in reading, math and science, an average of 88 percent of students across grades and subjects met proficiency standards, compared with 73 percent three years ago. Attendance is up, dropouts are down. Mooresville ranks 100th out of 115 districts in North Carolina in terms of dollars spent per student — $7,415.89 a year — but it is now third in test scores and second in graduation rates.

In the past, we have written about Apple Inc. practices on selling to school districts. We still insist that free trips to wine and woo school board members (or others who have the power of the taxpayer purse) is not a good, ethical practice by Apple. It would be more appropriate for Apple sales staff to visit the schools. But this piece in the Times does reveal more of the economics of Apple deals with schools. It also reveals the impact on local jobs. We welcome reader comments on these issues.

Start with math lessons: each student’s MacBook Air is leased from Apple for $215 a year, including warranty, for a total of $1 million; an additional $100,000 a year goes for software. Terry Haas, the district’s chief financial officer, said the money was freed up through “incredibly tough decisions.”

Sixty-five jobs were eliminated, including 37 teachers, which resulted in larger class sizes — in middle schools, it is 30 instead of 18 — but district officials say they can be more efficiently managed because of the technology. Some costly items had become obsolete (like computer labs), though getting rid of others tested the willingness of teachers to embrace the new day: who needs globes in the age of Google Earth?

Families pay $50 a year to subsidize computer repairs, though the fee is waived for those who cannot afford it, about 18 percent of them. Similarly, the district has negotiated a deal so that those without broadband Internet access can buy it for $9.99 a month. Mr. Edwards said the technology had helped close racial performance gaps in a district where 27 percent of the students are minorities and 40 percent are poor enough to receive free or reduced-price lunches.

Via The New York Times


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